Links Archives

  1. Surviving UI Programming →

    I used to do primarily front-end web development (UI coding) before getting into the back-end stuff. The back-end stuff is less fiddly and feels more elegant. Whenever I do front-end work it always feels like I’m writing more code that I should be (generally to handle lots of edge cases). But I love creating a great user experience, and that means fiddly front-end code.

  2. Constants and Reading and Writing →

    I preach the same thing, my reasons don’t just include readability, but simplicity and searchability too.

    Where are we handling 200 responses?

    I’ll search for “200”… there it is.

    I especially encourage this in WordPress dev when relating to WordPress post meta keys, filter and action names, etc. It makes refactoring easier too.

  3. Write Code Every Day →

    This starts next week for me (after vacation). I needed this as a kick in the patoot; I’m not making progress at the speed I want to on my current project and a big part of that is context switching costs for days when I don’t get to code. We’ll see how I do.

  4. Executive Retreats →

    My retreat a few years back with Dan and Scott was awesome. I can see how doing it with just your own team would also be awesome; in a different way. There are definitely some ideas that require distance to soak in them properly.

  5. Heartbleed and Pinboard →

    In layman’s terms, the bug was the equivalent of asking a stranger “hey, what’s up?” and having them tell you their most private thoughts, going on about their divorce, sharing their credit card info, whatever was on their mind at the time. You could keep asking “what’s up” as often as you wanted, and hear new things each time. Worst of all, the stranger would have no recollection that it had happened.

  6. Hack Isn’t PHP →

    You’re effectively writing in a new language, albeit with a much smaller learning curve than other language switches since you already know most of the syntax and API. But because Hack isn’t PHP, some of PHP’s biggest advantages – ubiquity, maturity, stability – don’t apply.

    I agree with a lot of this. As well as the follow up.