Projects Archives

  1. WordPress 3.5

    WordPress 3.5 is out. Go grab it, it’s a great upgrade! Congratulations to the core team on a very solid upgrade. Particular kudos to Andrew Nacin and Daryl Koopersmith for their great work in leading the release and overhaul of the media features. We will have compatibility releases of our commercial WordPress products (RAMP, Carrington…

  2. Share Icon – 6th Anniversary

    It was 6 years ago that I first floated the idea of a generic icon for sharing1 – I’m thrilled and amazing at how well this little icon has done. It’s great to see ShareThis going strong as well. Above are a few screenshots I’ve captured over the years of the share icon in action.…

  3. Take RAMP for a Spin

    RAMP demo

    We recently added the ability to take RAMP for a test drive before you buy. On the RAMP page, click that “Demo” button to sign up and we’ll set up both a staging and production WordPress site for you – with RAMP installed and configured on both sites. You can log in, create and upload…

  4. Twitter Tools 3.0 Screencast

    To compliment the screencast I did to demonstrate features of Social, I put together a quick (and very rough) walk through of some of the features of Twitter Tools 3.0. I found a bug there at the end. From my testing it looks like a multi-byte string length calculation bug (the apostrophe in is curly),…

  5. Social 2.6

    Social 2.6 is now available for download! This release was initially intended to handle a smallish set of bug fixes, but then Twitter announced version 1.1 of their API and we figured while we were in there we might as well make all the changes necessary for compatibility. So the good news is that this…

  6. Twitter Tools 3.0.2

    I’ve released Twitter Tools 3.0.2 to address a handful of bugs and add a few customization points: Add aktt_tweet_create_blog_post filter to allow other plugins/code to make programatic decisions about when to create blog posts from tweets Add aktt_tweet_create_blog_post_format filter to allow post format to changed or omitted Properly apply title prefix when creating blog posts…

  7. Twitter Tools’ Data Upgrade Process

    tweet-upgrade-notice

    One of the important changes in Twitter Tools 3.0 is the way that tweet data is stored in your WordPress database. Instead of writing that content in a separate database table the tweets are now stored as a custom post type within the posts table. This gives us all sorts of great benefits: it utilizes…

  8. Twitter Tools 3.0.1

    I released Twitter Tools 3.0.1 last night to address all confirmed bugs in version 3.0: Respect timezone offset for new posts from tweets Ensure categories and tags are set properly for new posts from tweets Make enabled/disabled accounts more visually explicit Use proper URL example in help text Want more details? Check out the diff.…

  9. Twitter Tools 3.0 FAQ

    Wherein I attempt to answer some of the more common questions I’ve seen surrounding yesterday’s launch of Twitter Tools 3.0. Why am I forced to use the Social plugin to use Twitter Tools? I assure you, no one is forcing you to do anything. Why is Twitter Tools now dependent on Social? When Twitter moved…

  10. Twitter Tools 3.0

    When I first started posting to Twitter I soon realized that I wanted to keep a copy of that content. Twitter Tools was born shortly thereafter. Since that time Twitter has evolved, WordPress has evolved, and my vision of how best to integrate the two has evolved with them. Twitter Tools 3.0 is a complete…

  11. Sticky Post Support in Carrington Core

    Carrington Core hasn’t changed much over the last few years. It’s stable, does what it’s supposed to do, and is extensible via standard WordPress APIs. Last night I merged in code to implement a new/overlooked feature for the first time in quite a while: support for sticky posts. This is part of the posts context,…

  12. How to Safely Use Plugin Functions in a Theme

    I feel like I’d be remiss if I didn’t add this to the conversation. I’ve seen some people indicating that calling plugin functions in themes is a bad idea (here’s an example comment to that effect). I think this is going too far – including a call to a plugin in a theme is fine…

  13. How to End-of-Life a Plugin

    Yesterday I released a version of Popularity Contest that removed all functionality and simply delivered a message that the plugin was discontinued and not recommended. It was the first time I’ve done this with a plugin, and it turns out I hadn’t thought through some of the ramifications of the changes I made. Here is…

  14. RIP: Popularity Contest

    As previously noted Popularity Contest had a good run but is no longer recommended. As such, I’ve gone ahead and disabled the default version in the plugin repository on WordPress.org, with an explanatory note. This post is part of the thread: Content Presentation – an ongoing story on this site. View the thread timeline for…