Link Archives

  1. Getting Started with BusyContacts →

    Wow! The BusyMac folks sure have been busy! I know, I know… I couldn’t help myself. As a BusyCal user for years I’m looking forward to playing with this, it sounds awesome.

    UPDATE: Wow, I’m blown away. I imported my contacts from iCloud, Twitter and Facebook. It took me 15 minutes to manually link the few contacts that weren’t auto-linked. Then the Combine Linked Cards view (this should be on by default IMO) made all the dupes go away. So cool!

  2. BBEdit 11.0 Release Notes →

    Two big things that are now off my wishlist:

    There is a new control in the status bar at the bottom of text views; it displays the current magnification of the view and allows you to change it. The control can be hidden (or shown) using the “Text Magnification” option in the Appearance preferences.

    This means I no longer need to use another editor when presenting on a projector, etc. I also like larger views for writing prose, so I’ll probably use BBEdit more for that now as well.

    There is now an adjustable split between the Currently Open Documents list and the Project list.

    Now I can go back to using BBEdit as I did so lovingly pre-version 10 (when the open document list was in a drawer)! I submitted a ticket requesting that this pane be made resizable in 2011. :)

  3. about.me Backstory →

    I pitched nearly the same idea to some friends a few months ago, but with a focus on storytelling and accomplishments rather than just having links. I think something like this has the potential to be much more compelling and useful than a traditional resume.

  4. America Is Not For Black People →

    The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying.

    If officers are soldiers, it follows that the neighborhoods they patrol are battlefields. And if they’re working battlefields, it follows that the population is the enemy. And because of correlations, rooted in historical injustice, between crime and income and income and race, the enemy population will consist largely of people of color, and especially of black men. Throughout the country, police officers are capturing, imprisoning, and killing black males at a ridiculous clip, waging a very literal war on people like Michael Brown.

    Of everything I’ve read about Ferguson, this piece (inflammatory title aside) probably does the best job of taking a holistic view of the situation.